You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Contact’ tag.

Just a quickie. All of these names can be found on my list The Talent, but I figured they can get lost in there and I’d push them up to the surface for you all.

Scan the names and see if you’re missing out on the important/irrelevant bleatings of these notable camera-lords and camera-ladies.

StephenVoss
Steven Voss, Washington, DC
andrewcutraro
Andrew Cutraro, Washington, DC
edkashi
Ed Kashi
heislerphoto
Todd Heisler
rspencerreed
Ryan Spencer Reed
JasonEskenazi
Jason Eskenazi
AlanSChin
Alan Chin, Brooklyn, NY
davidb383
David Burnett, Washington DC
stevebloomphoto
Steve Bloom, England
dpeveto
Daryl Peveto
evanvucci
Evan Vucci
jmott78
Justin Mott, Hanoi, Vietnam
StrazzPOY
Scott Strazzante, Yorkville, IL
jonkgoering
Jon Goering, Lawrence, KS
sinclair_photo
Mike Sinclair, Kansas City
PhotoPhilan
PhotoPhilanthropy, California
radical_images
Radical Images, East Midlands UK
Kastenskov
Henrik Kastenskov, Vejle
maisiecrow
Maisie Crow, New York
jturnley
James Turnley
juansierraphoto
Juan Sierra, Germany
OLOLtoo
Kendrick Brinson, Atlanta, GA
AaronJoelSantos
Aaron Joel Santos, Hanoi, Vietnam
jeffcurto
Jeff Curto, Chicago, IL
martincregg
Martin Cregg, Dublin
consumptive
James Luckett, Ohio
jesshurdphoto
Jess Hurd, London
VizJournalist
John Waskey, Portland, OR
tomtveitan
Tom Tveitan, Norway
fotofugitive
Tim Humble, Noosa, Sunshine Coast
photomorel
Daniel Morel, Haiti
davidalanharvey
David Alan Harvey, NYC, Outer Banks
FredoDupoux
Frederic Dupoux
wemarijnissen
Wendy Marijnissen, Islamabad, Pakistan
dascruggs
Daniella Scruggs, D.C. Metro Area
themexican
Raul Gutierrez
sheimages
Sheila Pree Bright
Moishevitz
Juliana Beasley, Jersey City, NJ
tajforer
Taj Forer, Connecticut
jeffantebi
Jeff Antebi
mattshonfeld
Matt Shonfeld, Bath, UK
jonsnyder
Jon Snyder, San Francisco
americanyouth
American youth book, NYC
douglaslowell
Douglas Lowell, Portland, OR
imaclellan
Ian MacLellan, Lincoln, MA
EmilyShur
Emily Shur
JaneFultonAlt
Jane Fulton Alt, Chicago
brazil_photos
Ricardo Funari, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
toddhido
Todd Hido, San Francisco Bay Area
billvaccaro
Bill Vaccaro
adamvlau
Adam Lau, San Francisco
PipAndrews
Philip Scott Andrews
DannyGhitis
Danny Ghitis, Brooklyn, NY
pangeaphoto
Pangea Photo
prospektphoto
Prospekt, Milan, Italy
terakopian
Edmond Terakopian, UK
NoBarriersPhoto
No Barriers Photogrphy, Vancouver, BC
CollegePhotog
CPOY, Columbia, MO
dsheaphoto
Daniel Shea, Chicago
dominicnahr
Dominic Nahr, Kenya
mrubee
Michael Rubenstein
greglutze
Greg Lutze, Pacific Northwest
reduxpictures
Redux Pictures
johnkeatley
John Keatley, Seattle, WA
hillerphoto
Geoffrey Hiller, Dhaka, Bangladesh
ChrisHondros
Chris Hondros, New York, NY
tammydavid
Tammy David, Manila, Philippines
vigbalasingam
Vignes Balasingam, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
timmatsuiphoto
Tim Matsui, Seattle, WA
coreyfishes
Corey Arnold, Portland, OR
jimbourg
Jim Bourg, Washington, DC
stupilkington
Stuart Pilkington, High Wycombe, UK
Donaldverger
Donald Verger, Portland, Maine
NickTurpin
Nick Turpin, France
noahkalina
Noah Kalina, Brooklyn, NY
terukuwayama
Teru Kuwayama
benrobertsphoto
Ben Roberts, Bournemouth, UK
alvarezphoto
Stephen Alvarez, Charlotte, NC
davidsolomons
David Solomons, London
erikborst
Erik Borst, Amsterdam, Holland
squarerootof9
Trey Hill, Dallas, TX
quesofrito
Emiliano Granado, NYC
50statesproject
50 States Project, USA
RachelPapo
Rachel Papo, Brooklyn, New York
alphabetproject
Alphabet Project
danielemattioli
Daniele Mattioli, Shanghai
shawnrocco
Shawn Rocco, Raleigh, North Carolina
jaredsoares
Jared Soares, Roanoke, Virginia
yingang
Ying Ang, Melbourne, Australia
jennyjimenez
Jenny Jimenez, Seattle, WA
hinius
Hin Chua, London
photogjack
Jack Kurtz, Phoenix, AZ
renaudphilippe
Renaud Philippe, Québec
thetravelphotog
Tewfic El- Sawy, NYC/London
A_Jax
Andrew Jackson, Birmingham, UK
alvarezmontero
Carlos Alvarez Montero
Peter_Marshall
London
mellyvanilla
Melanie McWhorter
ptrbkr
Peter Baker
dellicson
Davin Ellicson, Bucharest, Romania
OlivierLaude
Olivier Laude, San Francisco
matgrandjean
Mathieu Grandjean, Los Angeles
noahbeil
Noah Beil, Oakland, California
demotix
Global
claytoncubitt
Clayton Cubitt, New York
benblood
Ben Blood, Seattle, WA
ianvancoller
Ian van Coller, Bozeman, MT
natelarson
Nate Larson, Baltimore, MD
mrthibs18
Brandon Thibodeaux
gracegelder
Grace Gelder
andrewquerner
Andrew Querner, Alberta
jonfeinstein
Jon Feinstein, NYC
hellenvanmeene
Hellen van Meene, Heiloo, Holland
bendrum
Benjamin Drummond, Seattle, WA
tonystamolis
Tony Stamolis
liankevich
Andrei Liankevich
davewyatt
Dave Wyatt, Somerset, UK
coombskj
Kevin Coombs
miketsangphoto
Mike Tsang, London
lgreen66
Lauren Greenfield
KatharinaHesse
Katharina Hesse, Beijing
aphotostudent
James Pomerantz, New York
NadavKander
Nadav Kander, London
visualjourn
Brent Foster, Delhi, India
balazsgardi
Balazs Gardi
rogercremers
Roger Cremers, Amsterdam
shahidul
Shahidul Alam, Dhaka. Bangladesh
chrisdebode
Chris Debode, Amsterdam
abbiets
Abbie Trayler-Smith
foreilly
Finbar O’Reilly, Dakar, Senegal
rasermus
Espen Rasmussen
stevesimon
Steve Simon, NYC
borutpeterlin
Borut Peterlin, Slovenia
moooose
Mustafah Abdulaziz, Philadelphia
oeilpublic
Oeil Public, Paris, France (Now out of business)
gallagher_photo
Sean Gallagher, Beijing, China
jennackerman
Jenn Ackerman, New York
Amivee
Ami Vitale, Miami
ninaberman
Nina Berman
luceo
Luceo Images, US, Southeast Asia, Mexico
mattlutton
Matt Lutton, Belgrade, Serbia
Nathan_Armes
Nathan Armes, Denver, CO
timgruber
Tim Gruber, New York
timhussin
Tim Hussin, Washington D.C.
alan_w_george
Alan W George, San Francisco
MrToledano
Phillip Toledano, New York
mattslaby
Matt Slaby, Denver
wearemjr
MJR, Brooklyn, New York
caryconover
Cary Conover, Lower East Side, NYC
robot_operator
Dalton Rooney, Brooklyn, NY
loujones2008
Lou Jones, Boston, MA
gerik
Gerik Parmele, Columbia, MO
benlowy
Benjamin Lowy, Brooklyn, NY
tom_leininger
Tom Leininger, Texas
tomasvh
Tomas van Houtryve
timobarber
Tim Barber
newmediatim
Tim Lytvinenko

Photography in prisons and jails isn’t always edgy nor riven with fraught emotion. Sometimes it can be quite ordinary. In fact, given the utter boredom of most prison facilities it would be good to see a photo essay that communicated effectively vacuous time and psychological space.

…but, I digress. Hetherington, over at the venerable What’s The Jackanory?, indulged in some “shameless self promotion” of his magazine work at North Branch Correctional Institution. Within the Wired article, Prisoners Run Gangs, Plan Escapes and Even Order Hits With Smuggled Cellphones, Hetherington’s images include a cell-tableaux, sniffing dog and bagged phone. I am more interested in the non-published images Hetherington provides in his post; they’re crisp, pared down images of inmate and interior.

Andrew Hetherington for Wired

Andrew Hetherington for Wired

It got me thinking about how the environmental fabric – along with the representation – of American prisons has changed.

When (documentary) photographers first began accessing prisons – Danny Lyon, Conversations with the Dead (1971), Jacob Holdt; Taro Yamasaki, Inside Jackson Prison (1981) – the conditions were poor.  And prisons were only one response to criminal behaviour and social contract.

Even latterly, Ken Light shot the black & white, in-your-face and sweaty Texas Death Row (1994) and in doing so romanticised historicised American prisons as definitively dirty sites of “the other”. By the 1990s, though, the US had implemented long term custodial sentences as the primary “solution” to crime. The phase-out of Federal parole beginning with Reagan and culminating with Clinton bloated the Federal Bureau of Prison (BOP) population, alone, from 40,000 to 200,000.

So two trends intersected: Prison populations swelled resulting in overcrowding and economically efficient facilities were rapidly being built. The mass construction of new warehouses prisons altered the spatial experience of confinement and the nature of interpersonal interaction within. Cell tiers were replaced by AdSeg wings.

The BOP has a reputation for housing the hardened criminal and specialises in high security facilities. Additionally, from the late 1980s states were building their own new high security and supermax prisons. This new penological architecture replaced 40 foot brick walls and watch towers with razor wire and motion sensors.

Prison environments are sparse. Problems with dark corners & damp have been replaced with the psychotrauma of constant fluorescent light. Problems with stashed contraband have been replaced with an absence of surfaces to set down objects. Denim uniforms have been replaced by sweat outfits. The penological management of gangs & group violence has been replaced with the pharmacological management of locked-up basket cases.

One former inmate of the Federal Supermax facility in Florence, Arizona (ADX) has described it as the “Perfection of Isolation.”

Correctional Officer Jose Sandoval inspects one of the more than 2,000 cell phones confiscated from inmates at Calfornia State Prison in Vacaville, California. Rich Pedroncelli / AP

Correctional Officer Jose Sandoval inspects one of the more than 2,000 cell phones confiscated from inmates at Calfornia State Prison in Vacaville, California. Rich Pedroncelli / AP

Telephoning a way out Isolation

“Cell phones,” says James Gondles, executive director of the American Correctional Association, “are now one of our top security threats.” (Wired, July, 2009)

I posited in the past that cell phones were just one part of the prison economy and their commodity status was in direct reaction to the cost of corporate-managed prison payphone systems – in essence a racket in response to a racket. However. having read the Wired article it is clear how much of a serious security threat cell phones pose to prison authorities.

The majority of tactics for isolation, perfected over the past 30 years by prison administrations, are rendered immediately obsolete,

With a wireless handset, an inmate can slip through walls and locked doors at will and maintain a digital presence in the outside world. Prisoners are using voice calls, text messages, email, and handheld Web browsers to taunt their victims, intimidate witnesses, run gangs, and organize escapes—including at least one incident in Tennessee in which a guard was killed. An Indiana inmate doing 40 years for arson made harassing calls to a 23-year-old woman he’d never met and phoned in bomb threats to the state fair for extra laughs.

So what’s the answer? Debate exists over the value and legality of jamming all signals around prisons but a High School in Spokane, WA proved localised signal-jamming a bad idea when it interfered with the local Sheriff’s radio signals.

We should also bear in mind that ‘The 1934 Communications Act prohibits anyone except the federal government from interfering with radio transmissions, which now include cell calls.’ (Wired)

Criminalize Smuggling but Not Talking

TIME does a good job of breaking down the stats and describing the evolution of the problem. It is obvious that authorities are going to make strategic response to a growing trend but prison authorities must not compromise the already limited opportunities for inmates to talk with friends and family. Close family ties and contact are key to reducing recidivism and giving former prisoners the best means to integrate back into society.

And of course, inmates aren’t the only ones caught up in the illicit trade of cell phones in prisons. One California prison guard admittedly to making over $100,000 in a year through smuggling and selling cell phones!

On that note, I offer you a CDCR sanctioned news VT.

As so very often, the spark of thought was ignited by the Change.org Criminal Justice blog.

EMAIL

prisonphotography [at] gmail [dot] com

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