Ever wonder how many stories you’ve missed? Ever wonder if your world-view could be different?

Take a camera into a prison and you’re going to hear some honest tales. When people are going through a process of self-forgiveness or asking for forgiveness from others then honesty pours …

“I Knew a Man Named Simon”

In this film, M.K. talks honestly about his life as a British driug dealer – from the romance of guns to the denial of past customers. He talks with great frankness about his family, feelings and forgiveness.

The Forgiveness Project is an international charity which, among other activities, offers free digital media courses in British prisons. At the end of each course, the prisoners produce a short film on the subject of forgiveness

M.K’s story is well-delivered and uninterrupted by the questions or expectations of society. Other films from The Forgiveness Project are less gripping, but the purpose isn’t solely to entertain – it is to provide a medium through which an individual can unravel their thoughts, (often) guilt and apply forgiveness in a form that rings true.

Prisoners Offering Advise for New Prisoners

Brixton prison was in the news recently with the success of its radio station, so it should be no surprise it would also embrace film as a means to self-rehabilitation. According to the introduction, this is “the first ever film made by prisoners about life in a British prison uncensored and uncut.”

H.M.P. High Down also hosted The Forgiveness Project


Alistair Pirrie has been the lead on The Forgivness Project’s work in prisons.