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bryan wolf-M9-eclipse watchers copy
Bryan Wolf, “Eclipse watchers” (Grid M9).

On Saturday, my article The Grid Project: A Photo-Survey of Portland was published in The Oregonian. It was my first ever piece for The Oregonian, a paper which was founded in 1850 and predates official Oregon statehood which came about in 1859.

I wrote: “In 1995, Christopher Rauschenberg assembled a team of a dozen photography enthusiasts. Together, they sliced up a AAA map of Portland into square mile segments and resolved to hit the streets of each corresponding square and photograph, once a month, until no more squares remained. By 2004, they had documented all 89 squares within the city limits. At that time, the only thing to do was to start over. In September of this year, the Grid Project will complete its second full photo-survey of the Rose City.”

I wrote the article because The Grid Project is raising Kickstarter cash to replace its old, limited-function website with a new-spangly site with full on search, more images and happy-wide-eyed-users. With four days to go, just over $600 more is needed, so it looks like it’s going to make it.

When I arrived in Portland 18 months ago, folks at the Grid Project were some of the first I wanted to meet. Even though I don’t shoot photographs they let me join them for a meeting and look over images. Many of the Gridders are now friends.

The Grid Project is amazing. Here’s why:

1. It’s all about community.

2. It’s done for the love of photography; no one’s getting paid.

3 It’s a simple premise, but collectively 20 or so photographers have documented a changing Portland over nearly two decades. The estimated 40,000 images they’ve made is an incredible resource.

4. The Portland Grid Project invented the formula. The methodology has since been repeated around the globe in towns and cities such as Bradford, England; Toronto, Canada; Vancouver, WA; Victoria, BC; Rome, Italy; Providence, RI; Eugene, OR; Central Oregon; Napa Valley, CA; Philadelphia, PA; Forest Grove OR and Santa Fe, NM.

If you fancy a fancy print you should throw some money in the pot. Here’s some fine Grid Project images to stroke your eyeballs

Ann Kendellen, Pendleton Park, SW 53rd and Iowa, January 2011 (Grid N6) copy
Ann Kendellen, Pendleton Park, SW 53rd and Iowa, January 2011 (Grid N6).
BlakeAndrews, 2007, (Grid J12) copy
BlakeAndrews, 2007, (Grid J12).
Bruce Hall, Kid on the Sandy Blvd overpass for the 205 freeway, (Grid J12) copy
Bruce Hall, Kid on the Sandy Blvd overpass for the 205 freeway, (Grid J12).
CaroleGlauber FrankiesFranks copy
Carole Glauber. “Frankie’s Franks” SE 82nd, 2011.
ChristopherRaushenbergL9 copy
Christopher Rauschenberg, SE 15th Avenue, 2008 (Grid L9).
David Potter. %22Inside of Marci MacFarlane's car%22 North Interstate Avenue and Going Street, May 29th, 2005 (Grid J8) copy
David Potter. “Inside of Marci MacFarlane’s car” North Interstate Avenue and Going Street, May 29th, 2005 (Grid J8).
Lisa Gidley. NE 42nd Avenue near Sumner Street, September 2011 copy
Lisa Gidley. NE 42nd Avenue near Sumner Street, September 2011.
Nancy Butler (Grid N9) copy
Nancy Butler, “Untitled” (Grid N9).

Bruce Hall, Off of NE Fremont, (Grid K11) copy

Bruce Hall, Off NE Fremont, (Grid K11).
Mark Barnes Jessie
Mark Barnes, “Jessie”
Mark Barnes Foster Rd copy
Mark Barnes, “Foster Rd”
Rich Rollins
Rich Rollins
Lisa Gidley
Lisa Gidley
Ann Kendellen
Ann Kendellen
Ann Kendellen
Ann Kendellen
Faulkner Short
Faulkner Short
Barbara Gilson
Barbara Gilson
Alexis Pike
Alexis Pike
Patrick Stearns
Patrick Stearns (one image in a set of three) (Grid K8, 04/99).
David Potter
David Potter, (M14, August 2000).
George Kelly
George Kelly
Patrick Stearns
Patrick Stearns (one image in a set of three) (Grid G4, 04/00)
Faulkner Short
Faulkner Short

Eye On PDX is an ongoing series of profiles of photographers based in Portland, Oregon. See past Eye On PDX profiles here and here.

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I’ve been thinking about Portland recently and the potential importance of the Grid Project. I’ve been instructed to go to Christopher Rauschenberg to give my ideas the shakedown. This is because he’s largely responsible (although it is a collective effort), but also as one person mentioned over the weekend, “everything photography in Portland goes through Chris.” He is a founding member of Blue Sky Gallery, the regarded Portland photographer’s art collective.

Before I get to the Grid Project, I thought you’d get a kick out of Christopher’s answers lifted straight from this interview:

Do you feel you grew up in your dad’s shadow? He casts a big one.
Not at all. Both my parents were so full of joy and curiosity about life. They taught me how to look at the world. It was always, ‘Look at this piece of trash on the sidewalk. Isn’t it beautiful.’ I won the parent sweepstakes. The difference between me and George Bush is, we were both born on third base, but he thinks he hit a triple. I know I was born on third base, actually, a couple of feet from home plate.

You won the parent sweepstakes, but your dad was an alcoholic.
I’m not a big fan of alcohol. It’s more entertaining to be at full strength than be self-handicapped. Alcohol is a powerful dragon to slay. I’m sorry he couldn’t make that happen. People have flaws. He was a good deal as a dad.

The art world is quite hieratical, but he didn’t seem to be.
At museum openings, he was more interested in talking to museum guards than the director. He said he knew what the director was going to say but not the guards.

Were you impressed with his friends when you were growing up?
I wish I’d been more impressed. I remember one time I stopped by his place after school and he asked me to stay for dinner. Cartier-Bresson was coming. I said I couldn’t. I had homework.

RAUSCHENBERG, Robert. Brace (1962). Oil and silkscreen ink on canvas, 60 x 60 in. (152.4 x 152.4 cm) Collection of Robert and Jane Meyerhoff

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