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Kryspinow, August 2009 © Mark Power

Keynes Country Park Beach, Gloucestershire, 2008. © Simon Roberts

Image sources: Power, Roberts

© Laura Pannack

Laura Pannack is based in the UK and Lydia Panas in the US.

Pannack deals with the awkwardness and the concealed emotions of adolescence, Panas deals with the small gestures between family which may or may not infer awkwardness and concealed emotions.

The bare back, the turned back, the turned head, the caught glimpse and the avoided glance are all enticing props for a charged portrait.

Through their eye contact, both Pannack and Panas’ subjects foolishly ask us questions. Foolish because, let’s be honest, what do we know about childhood or teenage conundrums?

© Lydia Panas

© Laura Pannack

@ Lydia Panas

© Laura Pannack

© Lydia Panas

© Laura Pannack

© Lydia Panas

And Still We Gather With Infinite Momentum 1. © Justin James King

© Justin James Reed

Both of these photographers deal with big spaces in different ways.

Justin James King

Justin James Reed

Maurizio Anzeri

Asger Jorn

Ever since Maurizio Anzeri was roundly acknowledged as the star (here and here) of Paris Photo last November, his embroidered portraits have hung in a stasis awaiting the key association which my visual memory was willing upon them.

It only took six months, but the penny of association dropped: Asger Jorn‘s Defigurations (1962). Both artists appropriate existing images with humour, a touch of spite and avian motifs.

As Jorn used flea-market paintings and vintage subjects, so Anzeri picks up vernacular photographs and family portraits. Given their choice of materials you might think that they hold some reverence for the original object, and yet their surface interventions are violent, in most cases obliterating recognisable features.

Maurizio Anzeri

Asger Jorn

Maurizio Anzeri

Asger Jorn

I am currently obsessed with Alex Webb and the way he piles everything on top of everything else. Working on a post last week, I was reminded of a commercial shoot I saw last year.

© Alex Webb/Magnum Photos. CUBA. Sancti Spiritus. 1993. Baseball fans.

@ Ben Baker. FedEx Board of Directors

Ben Baker‘s website and interview. Alex Webb‘s website

Samuel F. B. Morse's Daguerreotype Equipment, by Thomas Smillie, 1888, Smithsonian Institution Archives

Samuel F. B. Morse's Daguerreotype Equipment, by Thomas Smillie, 1888, Smithsonian Institution Archives

Source, and more here.

Little Electric Chair. Andy Warhol, 1965

Little Electric Chair (Detail). Andy Warhol, 1965

Merry A. Foresta, Director Smithsonian Photography Initiative, informs,

“In addition to being the Smithsonian’s first staff photographer, Thomas Smillie was also the institution’s first photography curator. Interestingly, in 1896 when a formal Section of Photography was established Smillie was titled “Custodian” and the first objects he collected – bought for the sum of $23 – were the daguerreotype camera and photographic apparatus used by Samuel Morse, one of the first Americans to experiment with photography…”

When I saw the deathly familiar blue of Smillie’s cyanotype, I was thrown back to the electric hues of one of Warhol’s many electric chair prints.

From the rarest, unique image to the mass produced commodity. Both images of apparatus; both apparatus a steal on time and both definitively (institutionally) American.

The Smithsonian has operated Click! Photography Initiative for a couple of years now. They publish sporadically on The Bigger Picture Blog with a variety of essays about every imaginable application and interpretation of photographic culture in society. Contributors include high school kids to photography greats such as Robert Adams and a wealth of respected curators and educators including Wendy Ewald and Sandra Phillips. There’s even space for you if you wish to try you hand.

The project also nudged me back into the mind space and work of Bay Area heroine Carla Williams. Read her blog and your life will be better.

High Security Prison, Beit Lid, Israel, 1969. © Micha Bar Am

High Security Prison, Beit Lid, Israel, 1969. © Micha Bar Am

Hyse (from the Fish Work Norway series) © Corey Arnold 2009

Hyse (from the Fish Work Norway series) © Corey Arnold 2009

Convergences Archive

A study Salvador Dalí drew for a dream sequence in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Spellbound” (1944). Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí/Artists Rights Society, New York

A study Salvador Dalí drew for a dream sequence in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Spellbound” (1944). Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí/Artists Rights Society, New York

A detainee kicks a soccer ball around the central recreation yard at Camp 4, Joint Task Force (JTF) Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, June 10, 2008, during his daily outdoor recreation time. Detainees in Camp 4 get up to 12 hours of daily of outdoor recreation, including two hours in a central recreation yard. Photo Credit: U.S. Army 1st Lt. Sarah Cleveland

A detainee kicks a soccer ball around the central recreation yard at Camp 4, Joint Task Force (JTF) Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, June 10, 2008, during his daily outdoor recreation time. Detainees in Camp 4 get up to 12 hours of daily of outdoor recreation, including two hours in a central recreation yard. Photo Credit: U.S. Army 1st Lt. Sarah Cleveland

View: Archive of Prison Photography Convergences

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