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From the series Shelter by Henk Wildschut. From a shortlist of six photographers’ projects, Wildschut won the 20,000 Euro DUTCH DOC AWARD.

Last weekend was the Dutch Doc Festival.

The theme for this years Dutch Doc Festival is the slow type of journalism, which “focuses on long-term projects that frequently involve a strong personal commitment and steer clear of passing fashions. Projects that revisit a (pre-documented) subject in a sequel or to create a new sequence in follow-ups after set periods of time.”

Photoblogging duo Mrs. Deane were involved in the festivities and asked other bloggers and I to pitch in. They emailed:

To underline the relevance of the online community in shaping the contemporary debate, we would like to invite a number of what we consider ‘distinct voices’ to contribute to the festival via our presence. We would tremendously appreciate it, if you could select three photographic projects that you feel should be considered when discussing what’s needed right now, what people should be looking at, what has been forgotten, or what new projects are leading the way in the field of documentary photography (especially the kind that is also moving within the confines of the fine art galleries).

Ignoring the last criteria, I unapolo­get­i­cally picked three very polit­i­cal projects. Mrs. Deane posted my response over there, and I cross-post here for good measure.

THREE NEEDED PROJECTS

At a time when images rifle across our screens and reti­nas usu­ally serv­ing the pur­pose of illus­tra­tion or cor­po­rate pro­pa­ganda, the resolve of pho­tog­ra­phers to cre­ate bod­ies of work that deal with pol­i­tics — and often large nar­ra­tives too — can be read as either fool­hardy or enlight­ened. I’ll pick the latter.

Kevin Kunishi’s work in Nicaragua, Joao Pina’s doc­u­men­tary in South Amer­ica and Mari Bastashevski’s doc­u­ments from Chech­nya explore to varying degrees, “what has been for­got­ten.” Pho­tog­ra­phy is art and art should be polit­i­cal. If we con­sid­ered remem­ber­ing and mem­ory the first act in resis­tance against injus­tice then these three projects are high art.

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From los restos de la rev­olu­cion © Kevin Kunishi

Kunishi’s Los Restos de la Rev­o­lu­tion is a poignant look at the remains and the sur­vivors of the Nicaraguan civil war. The por­traits fea­ture both for­mer San­danista rebels and former US-sponsored Con­tras. The mun­dane every­day details along­side deep psy­cho­log­i­cal scars fol­low­ing con­flict can be easy to turn ones back on when the bombs stop light­ing up the skies. And it is easy to for­get the US’s impe­r­ial pol­icy and med­dling in this con­flict. One won­ders if Afghanistan will ever have a cush­ion of a sim­i­lar period of peace­ful time to be part of a sim­i­lar look back at the expe­ri­ences and actions of its cit­i­zenry amid con­flict.

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From File 126 © Mari Bastashevski

Mari Bastashevski’s File 126 doc­u­ments spaces pre­vi­ously inhab­ited by abductees who were “dis­ap­peared” dur­ing the Russian/Chechen con­flict. Bas­ta­shevski says, “the abducted are incor­po­real, as if they never were. They are no longer with the liv­ing, but they are not listed among the dead.” This is a par­tic­u­larly brave project given the state forces complicit in the depar­tures are still in power and their reac­tions to Bastashevski’s incon­ve­nient con­science are unknown.

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From Oper­a­tion Con­dor © Joao Pina

Joao Pina’s Oper­a­tion Con­dor expan­sive work across South Amer­ica, wants to both doc­u­ment and “pro­vide evi­dence” for ongo­ing mem­ory and tri­als into cases of of extra­ju­di­cial tor­ture, kid­nap and mur­der by the var­i­ous Right-wing Mil­i­tary Jun­tas in South Amer­ica dur­ing the 1970s and 80s. Like Nicaragua [and Kunishi’s work] the US had a strong influenc­ing hand in either estab­lish­ing or prop­ping up many of these hard­line gov­ern­ments. The crimes of thirty years ago are barely on the radar of the West­ern world how­ever. How quick we for­get! Pina is cur­rently rais­ing money for the next phase of his project at Emphas.is.

Colin and Joerg’s Selections

Mrs. Deane got a couple of other expert opinions.

Colin Pantall selected Third Floor Gallery, Timothy Archibald and Joseph Rock.

Joerg Colberg plumped for Brian Ulrich, Milton Rogovin and Reiner Gerritsen.

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The funeral of Horacio Bau a montonero militant from Trelew in the Argentine patagonia. He disappeared in La Plata in November 1977. His remains were found and buried nearly 30 years after. © João Pina

About this time last year, LENS blog featured João Pina’s ongoing project Operation Condor (since renamed Shadow of the Condor). Daniel J. Wakin wrote, “Operation Condor was a collusion among right-wing dictators in Latin America during the 1970s to eliminate their leftist opponents. The countries involved were Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay and Bolivia.”

João Pina has broken up those six countires into three segments and is currently raising funds via Emphas.is to complete the first focusing on Brazil.

Pina has already interviewed victims and families in Brazil:

In Recife in northeastern Brazil I interviewed and photographed Elzita Santa Cruz, a mother of ten who is now 97 years old. In 1964, when Brazil’s military dictatorship began, several of her children were arrested for political reasons on different occasions. In 1974, one of them, her son Fernando, became Brazil’s first politically “disappeared” person. Since then, Elzita has been demanding that the Brazilian authorities open their archives and explain what happened to Fernando and the other victims of the twenty-one-year dictatorship.

Having worked across South America for six years already, Pina will, as he intends, be able to create a “visual memory”, but as for making evidence for “use by a number of human rights organizations which are still trying to bring those responsible for Operation Condor’s repression to justice,” well, that’s an ambitious goal. Nevertheless, as a documentary project the subject is ranging and imperative. Good luck to him. I’ve stumped up some cash, so should you.

See the Emphas.is project page for Shadow of the Condor and see Pina’s video pitch.

MARTIN BATALLES REPRESENTING URUGUAY

LIVIA CORONA REPRESENTING MEXICO

MARCOS LOPEZ REPRESENTING ARGENTINA

Friend of Prison Photography, Emiliano Granado, likes football as much as he rocks at photography.

We pooled our knowledge to pair each country competing in South Africa with a photographer of the same nationality.

GROUP A

FRA France  – JR
MEX Mexico – Livia Corona
RSA South Africa – Mikhael Subotzky
URU Uruguay – Martín Batallés

GROUP B

ARG Argentina – Marcos Lopez
GRE Greece – George Georgiou (Born in London to Greek Cypriot parent)
KOR South Korea – Ye Rin Mok
NGA Nigeria – George Osodi

GROUP C

ALG Algeria – Christian Poveda
ENG England – Stephen Gill
SVN Slovenia – Klavdij Sluban (French of Slovenian origin … I know, I know, but you try to find a Slovenia born photographer!)
USA United States – Bruce Davison

GROUP D

AUS Australia – Stephen Dupont
GER Germany – August Sander
GHA Ghana – Philip Kwame Apagya
SRB Serbia – Boogie

GROUP E

CMR Cameroon – Barthélémy Toguo
DEN Denmark – Henrik Knudsen
JPN Japan – Araki
NED Netherlands – Rineke Dijkstra

GROUP F

ITA Italy – Massimo Vitali
NZL New Zealand – Robin Morrison
PAR Paraguay – ?????
SVK Slovakia – Martin Kollar

GROUP G

BRA Brazil – Sebastiao Selgado
CIV Ivory Coast – Ananias Leki Dago
PRK North Korea – Tomas van Houtryve (it was difficult to find a North Korean photographer)
POR Portugal – Joao Pina

GROUP H

CHI Chile – Sergio Larrain
HON Honduras – Daniel Handal
ESP Spain – Alberto García Alix
SUI Switzerland – Jules Spinatsch

Emiliano has been posting images from each of the photographers and doubled up on a few nations where the talent pool is teeming. You can see them all over on his Tumblr account, A PILE OF GEMS

NOTES

* Don’t even begin arguing about who should represent the USA. It is a never-ending debate.

* I’ll be honest, finding photographers for the African nations was tricky, even for a web-search-dork like myself. But then we knew about the shortcomings of distribution and promotion within the industry, didn’t we?

* For Chile, we had to look to the past legend Larrain. I’ll be grateful if someone suggest a living practitioner.

* North Korean photographer, by name, anyone? We had to fall back on van Houtryve because he got inside the DPR.

* Rineke Dijkstra was one of approximately 4 thousand-trillion dutch photographers who are everywhere.

* Araki was the easy choice. Ill admit – I know next to nothing about Japanese photography (Marc, help?)

* I wanted a few more political photographers in there, while Emiliano goes for arty stuff. I think we found a nice balance overall.

* And, SERIOUSLY, name me a Paraguayan photographer! PLEASE.

AUGUST SANDER REPRESENTING GERMANY

JULES SPINATSCH REPRESENTING SWITZERLAND

PHILIP KWAME APAGYA REPRESENTING GHANA

EMAIL

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